Monthly Archives: July 2012

BANK ROBBER ARRESTED 30 MINUTES AFTER TAKING $7K IN BAIT MONEY

Bank robbing isn’t what it used to be. It’s been quite a while since the gangsters of the 1920s could go on bank robbing sprees. With cameras, police guards, and other security measures taken over the years, it seems nearly impossible to get away with a bank robbery. Still, desperate thieves cannot seem to resist the piles of cash stored in these buildings. Unfortunately for them, and fortunately for the banks and citizens trusting their money is safe, GPS tracking technology has made bank robbery even more unsuccessful. With GPS tracking devices getting smaller and more affordable every year, they are becoming very effective theft recovery systems. By placing these devices on valuable property, like say, a stack of $20 bills being shoved into a bag at gunpoint, police can locate and return said property, often catching the thief red-handed.

 

Earlier this month, a 29-year-old man made off with more than $7 thousand after a bank robbery in Aurora, Illinois. Unbeknownst to him, a tiny GPS tracking device was hidden between the bills hastily shoved into his gray plastic bag. Miguel A. Ramirez is the primary suspect in the bank robbery, which took place around 9:15 a.m. at a PNC Bank branch, located at 77 S. Broadway. According to witnesses, Ramirez handed the teller a withdrawal slip which read, “all the money,” and pulled, what turned out to be, a BB gun out of his waistband. The teller was unable to read the slip, forcing Ramirez to whisper, “Give me all your money.” The teller proceeded to place the $7,026 from the register into the plastic bag. Ramirez allegedly grabbed the money, stuffed the gun back into his waistband, and fled the scene.

 

Police were alerted right away, and followed the signal emanating from the GPS tracking device to a BP gas station pump at 6501 U.S. Highway 34 in Oswego. By 9:35 a.m., police spotted Ramirez, who they recognized from the bank’s surveillance tapes, inside the BP store. An officer located the money bag inside an empty Ford Bronco, parked at the gas station. According to police, Ramirez turned quickly and appeared to start a conversation on his cell phone when he saw that police had arrived. He was arrested and is currently awaiting trail.

Author: Marisa O’Connor

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps tracking needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

3 FIRED FROM BURGER KING AFTER GPS DATA REVEALS BRANCH RESPONSIBLE FOR DISGUSTING VIRAL PHOTO

Fast food chains are not known for the highest quality food or employees. Patrons know there’s a slight risk of a hormonal teenager spitting in their onion rings. We’ve all heard horror stories of food poisoning, or worse, known of fast food employees who admit to such unsanitary behavior. We hope, however, that management can ensure that the food we pay for is hygienic and edible when it reaches our mouth. Health and safety codes are in place for a reason. E. Coli and other bacteria can cause serious illness and even death. When a viral photo made its way across the Internet earlier this month, of a Burger King employee standing in lettuce bins, people were less than amused and made sure that the employees were held accountable.

 

The half-witted employees posted the incriminating photo on the infamous 4Chan.com, a site known for disturbing content, with a caption that read, “This is the lettuce you eat at Burger King.” Apparently the employees either thought the forum would find the image amusing, or they were simply unaware that GPS location data is embedded and easily accessible on most photos posted online. This author’s guess would be the latter, considering the antagonistic tone of the posters caption. The GPS location data was quickly accessed by the tech-savvy readers at 4Chan.com, and traced the genius employees to a Burger King branch in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.

 

The readers at 4Chan.com rallied enough people to call and complain to the branch manager to get three employees fired from the chain. Burger King Corp. reported that it is “taking the issue very seriously” and stressed that there is zero tolerance for employees that violate the strict health codes for handling food. “The franchise has taken swift action to investigate this matter and has terminated the three employees involved in the incident,” a representative from Burger King Corp. said in a statement released to the Daily News. It seems that more and more often, GPS location data is used to hold criminals, and other unsavory characters, accountable for their actions.

Author: Marisa O’Connor

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps tracking needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

MY CHILD ID: FREE DOWNLOAD WAS OFFERED BY AMBER ALERT GPS

The months of June and July were special over at Amber Alert GPS, a top manufacturer ofGPS tracking devices for children and family safety company: they offered a free download of their My Child ID software. This software gives parents a simple yet secure way to keep important information about members of the family for quick access in the event of an emergency. Amber Alert GPS began offering the free download in June, which happens to be National Safety Month. So many people responded, the company decided to extend this offer for another month.

 

My Child ID allows parents and caregivers to create a profile for each member of the family. This includes vital information such as blood type, known drug or food allergies, medications taken, vaccinations, weight, height, eye color, different activities and sports, and emergency contacts, and is all accessed at the click of a button. If an emergency arises, the software gives parents an easy and quick way to send out alerts to predetermined contacts. It also allows locations to stored, such as school, home, daycare, doctor’s office, etc. for quick access.

 

“We are passionate about family safety and pleased to offer a free download of this important software to parents and families,” CEO of Amber Alert GPS Carol Colombo said. “Providing quick and easy access to important information about family members is key to helping make the world a safer place for our children and giving parents peace of mind.”

 

The goal of Amber Alert GPS is simple: keep children safe while leaving their freedom intact. They also offer the V3 GPS tracking device, which allows the child to explore the world while at the same time assure their safety and peace of mind for the parents. ThisGPS tracking device, and software like My Child ID, allows families to lead their active lifestyles knowing information about their children is only a mouse click away in the event of an emergency.

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps tracking needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

MASSACHUSETTS TOWNS STUDYING PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ROUTES WITH GPS TO INCREASE EFFICIENCY

Five towns in Massachusetts are hoping to more efficiently provide public transportationto its people with a little help from GPS devices. The devices have been installed in their public transportation vehicles in order to find out who is riding and where they are headed, culminating in the merging of services next year based on the data collected.

 

A state grant to the tune of $185,000 was given to the towns of Acton, Boxborough, Littleton, Maynard, and Stow to affix the GPS devices and conduct the study. Officials feel their transportation services – geared toward the senior citizen segment of the population – often run into the situation of nearly-empty vans ending up at the same place at the same time. “What we’re hoping for, by combining these all together, is to have more locations where we can bring people and better accessibility,” said Acton’s health director Doug Halley, who happens to be leading the study.

 

The GPS devices will collect data from July to the end of September, at which point officials will come up with a plan to combine transportation services. It is Halley’s hope the shared busing will start by July 1 of 2013. The Clock Tower Place, an office park in Maynard which offers transportation to its’ employees, is also participating in the study.

 

“By having the GPS information, we’ll be able to compile a lot more data on what kind of overlap there is now,” said Keith Bergman, Littleton Town Administrator. “We’d like to move from the anecdotal to the analytical. The solution is going to require specific information about how many trips are we running, how many people are on them, where are they, when are they – that data will be vital to finding a better way to provide the service.”

 

This isn’t at all about money as some readers may suspect, it’s more about increased efficiency and no additional funds needed from the town – working with what they are already allotted in their transportation budget and no more. “It’s not a case of money,” according to Maynard’s town administrator Michael Sullivan. “It’s how we’re spending the money.” Sullivan sees the less populated western area of Massachusetts offering more transportation options as compared to Maynard, and said, “Coming from a region that is much less dense but has solved this riddle, I don’t see why we can’t.”

 

Halley said that besides sharing drivers and vehicles, towns will probably have a centralized dispatch service as well. As it is now, if a senior citizen needs a ride, they must put in a request anywhere from 24 to 48 hours in advance. “We would have a system that would be responsive immediately to people’s needs,” Halley said.

 

He added that consolidation is key, giving transportation services to sectors of the population that didn’t have it before. Acton is already doing this, providing transportation for the city’s children to recreation areas, but he said that the service is usually overbooked. “We have to say no to some of those people because they’re coming at different times from different locations,” said Halley. He feels the solution to this problem is consolidation of services with the other towns, which would add more vehicles to the fleet without purchasing a bus or van.

 

There are those who feel this GPS study will have negative effects on the senior citizen population. Alyson Toole is the executive director of the Council on Aging in Stow, and she feels the seniors will be spending too much time on the vans as it will be making more stops to pick up and drop off more passengers. She also points out that this van sharing could make it more difficult for the seniors to develop relationships with the drivers, as is currently the case. “The van driver really gets to know the seniors and their particular needs,” she said. “They become almost extra eyes and ears for the outreach. I’m willing to look into it. There’s pros and cons to everything. Just right now I haven’t seen the benefits as much.”

 

Sharon Mercurio agrees, director of the Acton Council on Aging. “If more school-aged children are using it after school, what about the senior that this is their only way to get to a doctor’s appointment,” she said. “It’s just those kinks that we’re going to have to work out.”

 

Halley said that the towns will work with different senior groups to assure their satisfaction in the service. “The goal of this is not to take away from the Councils on Aging, but to give more to them,” he said.

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps tracking needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

ENDURANCE SWIMMER TRACKED WITH GPS FAILS TO FINISH

Penny Palfrey set out on an impressive journey: a solo, cage-free, 107-mile swim from Cuba to the Florida Keys. The 49-year-old endurance swimmer made it three quarters of the way to her destination, before calling it quits just 28 miles from her destination. Although her swim was unassisted, Palfrey was monitored by a team of navigators and medical staff, as well as a GPS tracking device. Her team kept fans in the know with frequent twitter updates, proving location information from the GPS tracking device, along with general updates about the swim. If she had finished, Palfrey would have been the only female to successfully swim across the ocean without assistance or a shark cage.

 

The Australian endurance swimmer was going strong well past the half-way point. Her team reported ideal swimming conditions. Not to say that it was easy by any means. By that point, she had already endured painful jellyfish stings, and spotted a few hammerhead sharks along the way. Conditions remained positive up until the last official report around 10 p.m. Saturday night, which placed Palfrey 79 miles from her Cuban starting point. Apparently, the swimmer ran into some difficult currents, because two hours later, the GPS tracking device revealed little progress made. Shortly after that point, she decided to cut the swim short. Her team announced the defeat via Twitter, and tweeted, “Penny Palfrey had to be pulled out of the water … due to a strong southeast current that made it impossible for her to continue her swim. Penny is presently on her escort boat being taken care of by her crew.”

 

“She is fine,” confirmed Andrea Woodburn, one of Palfrey’s team members, on a telephone call from Key West. This particular swim has been attempted several times by the bravest and best endurance swimmers around the world. In 1997, another Australian swimmer, Susie Maroney completed the swim at the age of 22, but she used a shark cage. More recently, an American swimmer, Diana Nyad, made two unsuccessful cageless crossings. The first time her swim was cut short because of an asthma attack, and the second time was due to Portuguese man o’war stings.

Author: Marisa O’Connor

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

E911 SOLUTION OFFERED BY ERF WIRELESS FOR OIL AND GAS RIGS

ERF Wireless has announced an e911 solution which relies on GPS technology, created to support their wireless network exclusively for the domestic oil and gas exploration sector, their Energy Broadband subsidiary. The company boasts the largest national terrestrial wireless network specifically for this sector. What is the significance? It could mean saving the lives of rig workers in the case of an emergency, despite the lack of a physical address in the most remote areas of the United States.

 

Most of the revenue generated by ERF Wireless comes from this terrestrial wireless broadband communications offering, which includes VoIP phone service, for oil and gas rigs in remote areas that would not normally receive an average cellular phone signal. The places these rigs are running are oftentimes on unmarked roads. It might be a small path over ranch land, or a new road built specifically to access a rig, not marked on even the most current of maps. This makes it hard to dispatch emergency crews when necessary. Even if an address were connected to the rig just for emergency purposes, this address would be nonexistent on any maps emergency crews might use. Besides, the drilling rig typically changes location every few weeks or so, making it even harder to give the rig its own address.

 

ERF Wireless has done the seemingly impossible, putting in place a highly specialized e911 system that uses the GPS coordinates of the site’s VoIP service to calculate location, making it easy to contact the closest 911 call center. Furthermore, it allows the call center to send adequately prepared emergency personnel, more specifically those personnel armed with the GPS devices required to find these remote locations. Dr. Dean Cubley, ERF Wireless CEO, said, “As our client base and network continues to expand, we recognize that from time to time customer emergencies may arise. We are very pleased to have deployed a solution to help protect the rig-site workers. This new development is just another example of our continuing effort to improve our products and services as we gain new business on a weekly basis and expand our networks to meet the ever changing oil and gas sector needs.”

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

TRACKING THAT FITS THE AVERAGE FAMILY BUDGET

A new product from Garmin makes it possible for you to affordably track anything with feet, wheels, or wings. Granted, you can track most smartphones at home, but sometimes your teenaged adventurers can “forget” to keep their phones on them, particularly if they know you are watching. Also, there are some trackable subjects that can’t carry phones (pets, for instance). The Garmin GTU 10 is small enough to attach to nearly anything, and sends back regular updates to the person back at home base. While this GPS equipment, like many others, experiences signal failure when surrounded by tall buildings, it has a few very useful features that makes it ideal for most families with a need for tracking ability.

The most popular and reliable feature of the Garmin GTU 10 is its geofencing application. On a map, the user can stake out a perimeter, then program the GPS equipment to send an alert by email or text message if it crosses the border. This is great, not only for keeping a tracked item, pet, or person inside a certain area, but also for finding out when someone enters the area—a spouse driving to work or a teen biking to school, for example. Since this feature is usually not hampered by “urban canyons” and saves battery life when compared to a periodic update system, it is powerful and quite reliable.

The standard real-time tracking that we expect in GPS equipment like this is available as well, although it works on a periodic update basis. You can set it to report location twice every minute, but the battery will only last up to 24 hours. If you only want updates every fifteen minutes, on the other hand, you might get four weeks of use before recharging the battery.

The size of the Garmin GTU 10 is another important point. It is only one by three inches in size, and less than an inch thick. It’s light enough for a jogger to forget about it, and small enough to live in a backpack without taking up valuable textbook area. The first year of service is free with the unit’s purchase, but after that the service costs about 50 dollars annually.

Author: Mark Rummel

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

MASSACHUSETTS TOWNS STUDYING PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ROUTES WITH GPS TO INCREASE EFFICIENCY

Five towns in Massachusetts are hoping to more efficiently provide public transportationto its people with a little help from GPS devices. The devices have been installed in their public transportation vehicles in order to find out who is riding and where they are headed, culminating in the merging of services next year based on the data collected.

 

A state grant to the tune of $185,000 was given to the towns of Acton, Boxborough, Littleton, Maynard, and Stow to affix the GPS devices and conduct the study. Officials feel their transportation services – geared toward the senior citizen segment of the population – often run into the situation of nearly-empty vans ending up at the same place at the same time. “What we’re hoping for, by combining these all together, is to have more locations where we can bring people and better accessibility,” said Acton’s health director Doug Halley, who happens to be leading the study.

 

The GPS devices will collect data from July to the end of September, at which point officials will come up with a plan to combine transportation services. It is Halley’s hope the shared busing will start by July 1 of 2013. The Clock Tower Place, an office park in Maynard which offers transportation to its’ employees, is also participating in the study.

 

“By having the GPS information, we’ll be able to compile a lot more data on what kind of overlap there is now,” said Keith Bergman, Littleton Town Administrator. “We’d like to move from the anecdotal to the analytical. The solution is going to require specific information about how many trips are we running, how many people are on them, where are they, when are they – that data will be vital to finding a better way to provide the service.”

 

This isn’t at all about money as some readers may suspect, it’s more about increased efficiency and no additional funds needed from the town – working with what they are already allotted in their transportation budget and no more. “It’s not a case of money,” according to Maynard’s town administrator Michael Sullivan. “It’s how we’re spending the money.” Sullivan sees the less populated western area of Massachusetts offering more transportation options as compared to Maynard, and said, “Coming from a region that is much less dense but has solved this riddle, I don’t see why we can’t.”

 

Halley said that besides sharing drivers and vehicles, towns will probably have a centralized dispatch service as well. As it is now, if a senior citizen needs a ride, they must put in a request anywhere from 24 to 48 hours in advance. “We would have a system that would be responsive immediately to people’s needs,” Halley said.

 

He added that consolidation is key, giving transportation services to sectors of the population that didn’t have it before. Acton is already doing this, providing transportation for the city’s children to recreation areas, but he said that the service is usually overbooked. “We have to say no to some of those people because they’re coming at different times from different locations,” said Halley. He feels the solution to this problem is consolidation of services with the other towns, which would add more vehicles to the fleet without purchasing a bus or van.

 

There are those who feel this GPS study will have negative effects on the senior citizen population. Alyson Toole is the executive director of the Council on Aging in Stow, and she feels the seniors will be spending too much time on the vans as it will be making more stops to pick up and drop off more passengers. She also points out that this van sharing could make it more difficult for the seniors to develop relationships with the drivers, as is currently the case. “The van driver really gets to know the seniors and their particular needs,” she said. “They become almost extra eyes and ears for the outreach. I’m willing to look into it. There’s pros and cons to everything. Just right now I haven’t seen the benefits as much.”

 

Sharon Mercurio agrees, director of the Acton Council on Aging. “If more school-aged children are using it after school, what about the senior that this is their only way to get to a doctor’s appointment,” she said. “It’s just those kinks that we’re going to have to work out.”

 

Halley said that the towns will work with different senior groups to assure their satisfaction in the service. “The goal of this is not to take away from the Councils on Aging, but to give more to them,” he said.

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

MINISCULE LNAS ENHANCE GPS SIGNAL RECEPTION THANKS TO NXP

NXP Semiconductors N.V. has released the BGU8006 low-noise amplifier (LNA), the smallest GPS LNA available on the market, for small portable GPS devices. It is available in an insanely small WLCSP (wafer-level chip-scale package), with a footprint of a mere 0.65 X 0.44 X 0.2 mm requiring just two external components. This saves 38 percent in PCB space as compared to today’s smallest available solution. It features a very low noise figure of 0.60 dB and offers the very best reception for normally weak GPS signals by suppressing stronger WLAN and cellular transmit signals. NXP’s BGU800x series of LNAs was showcased at the IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium (IMS2012) in Montreal in late June.

 

“Smartphones, tablets, personal navigation devices and automotive telematics applications all suffer from communication delays when network reception is poor, and have to wait for data to refresh as the GPS searches for satellite signal. Our new BGU8006 LNA helps to maintain optimal GPS signal reception for as long as possible – on a chip that is so small, it isn’t even visible to the naked eye,” said the marketing director of the RF small signal product line at NXP Semiconductors, Erick Olsen. “As GPS functionality becomes ubiquitous, the ability to deliver better accuracy and faster Time to First Fix will vastly improve user experience and enable operators to provide more sophisticated Location Based Services down the line.”

 

The BGU8006 LNA relies on adaptive biasing techniques to detect in an instant any signal from jammers, temporarily increasing the current, all powered by the state-of-the-art QuBIC4Xi SiGe:C BiCMOS process technology. This adaptive biasing suppresses stronger WLAN, Bluetooth, and cellular signals which normally send typical GPS LNAs into compression, creating harmonics and intermodulation that typically beat out the weaker signals, ultimately leading to shoddy GPS reception. The adaptive biasing technology of the BGU8006 improves linearity – 10 dB better IP3 under -40 to -20 dBm jamming conditions – and provides more effective output up to -15 dBm.

 

The size of the BGU8006 LNA is perfect for small GPS devices. The WLCSP cuts down on parasitic inductance because there aren’t any interposer connections, leads, or bond wires, and also improves size, cost, and thermal characteristics. NXP is also offering the BGU8007 LNA, which is a 1.45 X 1.0 X 0.5 mm 6-pin leadless SOT886 package. Both of the LNAs rely on only one external matching inductor and one external decoupling capacitor for added savings.

 

These BGU800x LNAs are ideal for a host of devices relying on GPS technology: smartphones, tablets, personal navigation devices, feature phones, digital video and still cameras, GPS chip-set modules, and RF modules for phones. NXP also offers the BGU7004 and BGU7008, both AEC-Q100 qualified, for things such as emergency call and toll collection systems.

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.

RTK INTEGRATED WITH A SAASM GPS RECEIVER BY TAG

TAG (Technology Advancement Group, Inc.) along with ITT Exelis have announced they were successful in integrating their Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) system, which allows positioning accuracy to the centimeter based on high-precision measurements, from their embedded GPS receiver with Selective Availability Anti-Spoofing Module (SASM) technology. The Army Geospatial Center (AGC) of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has contracted TAG to provide a Precise Positioning Service (PPS) GPS Survey System (PGSS) that meets the strict requirements of deployed Army surveyors. The GPS controller, which integrates the embedded ITT Exelis SAASM GPS receiver, RTK algorithms, and an RTK radio, is a component of the PGSS contained in a compact package.

 

This technology, which is highly-integrated, is already built in kinematic applications and is easily customizable for a host of military applications, like robotics, machine control, and unmanned vehicles, but does not require a separate commercial RTK GPS receiver. This gives the user the utmost assurance of complete military system performance during all phases of operations. The added bonus: a single receiver means smaller size, power, weight, and cost.

 

“We are proud that our solution enables AGC and other military customers to have access to centimeter-level accurate positioning while simultaneously enjoying the benefit of a fully-certified SAASM-based embedded GPS receiver,” said TAG’s CEO Jim McEwan. “It will deliver full, uncompromising performance at all times without relying upon any commercial receiver technology.”

 

Orders are currently being taken for these receivers from authorized customers only. If customization is required, the units can be expected to be delivered in 90-120 days.

 

TAG is a leading provider of “ruggedized computing solutions” to the government and commercial customers for about 30 years. Their Tactical Systems Group works to develop rugged customized mobile electronic systems using their expertise and use of state-of-the-art technology, best practice processes, and leveraging existing modules.

Author: Khristen Foss

Source: www.rmtracking.com

Your one stop for gps monitoring needs, contact an experienced GPS Monitoring Specialist to assist you with any GPS situtation.